Their connected collars are part of a high-tech robotic milking system.

There is a lot of speculation about the impact of 5G on our daily lives,

from configuring autonomous cars to seemingly instantaneous downloads. But we could know what impact it will have on cows before most humans put it to the test. In southwestern England, 50 dairy cows now wear high-speed smart collars that control robotic milking systems. It is both a way to test the potential of 5G in agriculture and to unveil one of the rural network trials of Cisco Systems Inc.

More importantly, it is an opportunity to see how 5G can transmit data between sensors faster than a rural broadband connection. This seems simple enough: when a cow enters a milking parlor, its collar warns the machine to start firing. Of course, tracking animals with connected devices is not new, and we have seen many advanced technologies that are being introduced into agriculture. As in any other place, 5G simply promises to make these applications faster and easier.